Golden Arches East Essay

GOLDEN ARCHES EAST 1 Introduction a. A big mac, fries and coke are not foreign anymore b. over 30 million served at 20,000 McD’s in over 100 countries c. in 1995 McD’s grossed 30 million in sales and 14 million were from out of the country d. a new McD’s opens somewhere every 3 hours e. from 1990 to 1995 6,500 new McD’s were opened worldwide i. 2,800 in US ii. 700 in Japan iii. From only 1 to 62 in China iv. 333 in other East Asia countries f. Chinese Media could hardly hold back their praises for McD’s i. during the first three years of operation in the People’s Republic the company was celebrated as the model for modernization, sanitation, and responsible management g. Chinese political leaders expressed alarm towards american fast food chains h. argues that McDonaldization has taken place across the globe, even into the seemingly impervious institutions and parts of this world i. “eating at the golden arches is a total experience” i. takes people out of their daily lives and provides a hot meal, separating the consumer from the cooking and preparation j. it appears that McD’s is an intrusive force, undermining the integrity of East Asian Cuisine i. as it loses its exotic appeal, it becomes localized and accepted k. the process of localization i. it correlates closely with the maturation of a generation of local people who grew up eating at the Golden Arches ii. by the time the children of these orignial consumers enter the scene, McD’s is no longer perceived as a foreign enterprise. iii. for children it represents fun, familiarity, and a place where they can choose their own food, something that isnt permitted at home. l. McD’s symbolizes different things to different people at different times of their lives i. Predictability, safety, modernity, culinary tourism, and “connectedness” to the world beyond ii. he concludes saying that its plausible that their primary product is the experience itself. Chapter 1: McDonald’s in Beijing: The Localization of Americana • On April 23, 1992: o Largest McDonald’s restaurant in the world opened in Beijing.

The Impact Of Mcdonalds In East Asia

Ever since I could remember, my mother would take me to McDonald’s after she picked me up from day-care. It happened about once a week and I was always so excited. Part of the reason was because it was the only place where I knew I could go run around in the playhouse, while eating a Happy Meal, which indeed came with a toy. Not only did it make me happy, but my mom was able to do some work since I was so engaged with the “McDonald’s experience.”
In Golden Arches East, James L. Watson investigates how the McDonald’s culture of fast food appeals to people in the cities of East Asia, particularly with how the company connects with American culture. Watson focuses on key concepts when visiting each place, including localization of America in Beijing, food choices, identity and nationalism in Seoul, and changing manners and etiquette in Tokyo. Each city has a different aspect and attitude about McDonald’s that is determined by gender, age, and wealth of people. McDonald’s started the globalization of fast food across the world, in which cultural transformations and a new trend have arisen but has kept indigenous culture intact.
Before McDonald’s expanded into East Asia, many people only heard of the big golden arches but once the corporation settled in, cultural transformations took place. As weird as it may sound, table manners were one aspect of eating that changed because of the fast food environment. In Tokyo, McDonald’s impacted the taboo against eating with one’s hand, standing while eating, and how to eat ice cream (Watson 178). With that said, McDonald’s brought in a totally different way of eating for these people. They weren’t used to putting their hands directly on the food they were about to eat or lick ice cream with their tongues instead of using a spoon. McDonald’s brought this new etiquette to Japan and it took time for people to adjust but overtime people adapted to the change. Another example of how table manners changed was in Beijing. “In 1992 and 1993 customers in Beijing usually left all their rubbish on the table, letting the restaurant employees do the cleanup work” (Watson 52). Once McDonald’s came into the picture and they realized it was not a formal restaurant, customers started to clean up after themselves. Not only did table etiquette transform but also the child aspect of the golden arches increased in popularity. In these Eastern Asian cities, McDonald’s promotes heavily on personal interactions with customers, which is why they have “Aunt” or “Uncle McDonald.” This received a ton of attention from the children who would come in to eat. The children feel special, as if they will always have a friend to talk to when they go to McDonald’s. “To millions of children who watch Chinese television, “Uncle McDonald” (alias Ronald) is probably more familiar than the mythical characters of Chinese folklore” (Watson 10). It is evident that this image of “Uncle McDonald” is directly related to children wanting to go to...

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