World War 1 Essay Dbq Essays

Many people like to believe the cause of World War I was the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. Although that did trigger the war, it did not start the up rising problems. War doesn’t just happen over night; there were problems long before Franz Ferdinand died. Problems such as militarism, alliances, nationalism, imperialism, and then the assassination of Franz Ferdinand.

Militarism led to problems because every country had confidence that its new technological weaponry and troop count could defeat any other country, which led to a severe lack of negotiations. And the only way to find out whose military is better, is to fight.

Another key factor that played a role in World War I was alliances. Alliances caused them to be more “cocky” towards each other because they knew if they went to war they had someone behind there back. This can be compared to as a domino effect. Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia on July 28, 1914. On July 29, Russia ordered a partial mobilization only against Austria-Hungary in support of Serbia, which escalated into a general mobilization. The Germans threatened war on July 31 if the Russians did not demobilize. On August 1, Germany declared war on Russia, and two days later, on France. The German invasion of Belgium to attack France, which violated Belgium's official neutrality, prompted Britain to declare war on Germany. And that’s when World War I had begun.

Nationalism played a role in WW1 because it encouraged people to be loyal to their countries and also began to make people feel superior in some ways. It was like everyone wanted power. And we all know that everyone can’t be on top.

Imperialism led to WW1 because their were fewer areas of the world left to colonize, so countries were competing for existing colonies, and seeking to expand their borders with neighboring nations. And when you compete for land or anything their will only be one victor causing the loser to be mad.

Lastly the “spark” of World War I...

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Underlying Causes of WWI Essay

644 Words3 Pages

In the early 1900’s, the entirety of Europe was divided into various alliances and powers, most notably the Triple Alliance (Germany, Astro-Hungarian Empire, and Italy) and the Triple Entente (France, Russia, and the United Kingdom), which ultimately fell into a hellish firestorm of mustard gas and trench warfare in 1914 that left 18 million dead and Europe’s economies and production decimated manyfold (DBQ Project, Various – Document D). The destruction of the turn-of-the-century nations and Empires that slaughtered over people stems from a chronological progression of ambitious Imperialism, extreme Nationalism, and rapid Militarism. The first idea, Imperialism, began an ideal that would begin pitting European nations at each…show more content…

In the early 1900’s, the entirety of Europe was divided into various alliances and powers, most notably the Triple Alliance (Germany, Astro-Hungarian Empire, and Italy) and the Triple Entente (France, Russia, and the United Kingdom), which ultimately fell into a hellish firestorm of mustard gas and trench warfare in 1914 that left 18 million dead and Europe’s economies and production decimated manyfold (DBQ Project, Various – Document D). The destruction of the turn-of-the-century nations and Empires that slaughtered over people stems from a chronological progression of ambitious Imperialism, extreme Nationalism, and rapid Militarism. The first idea, Imperialism, began an ideal that would begin pitting European nations at each other’s throats. The biggest and most audacious Imperialistic movements of the time lie in the Scramble for Africa, where first-world nations began colonization of Africa to increase their markets, land, and raw material possession (Various - Document P). Naturally, this pitted many nations at each other’s throats when land became scarcer and when raw materials began coming into much higher demand due to massive population growth, resulting in lots of expenditure in their peers (Various - Document P). Imperialism eventually became idealized with national security matters, economic success, and strategic positions for Imperialistic nations to take advantage of (Rich). According to French political economist Paul Leroy Beaulieu (1843-1916),

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